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Housing Team Meeting

This is the monthly meeting of the RocCity Coalition’s Housing Action Team. All those who are interested are welcome to attend & get involved!

Tentative Agenda:
– Introductions & Member Updates
– RCC AdCom Updates & Event Announcements
– Action Item Planning & Progress
– #HousingHighlight Content Review for Posting 8/10
– Next Steps
– Adjourn


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Become Part of Cohousing in Rochester

Discover Cohousing in Rochester with

Flower City Cohousing Community

 

Learn more about cohousing and our community’s plans. Orientations are free and open to the public, but we request a reservation. Our next orientation sessions will be held on: Monday, August 7, at 7 pm (RSVP by August 5th) Saturday, September 9, 10 am (RSVP by September 7)

No charge, but please register by emailing info@flowercitycohousing.org or call Jane at 585-315-2406 for details.

Learn about living in your own independent housing unit, while collaborating with and enjoying the benefits of neighbors committed to creating community.

Orientations are at 1010 East Avenue, near Culver in Rochester, in the red brick building to the left of the driveway on the Asbury Church campus.

Can’t make one of our regularly-scheduled orientations? No problem! Contact us and we’ll meet with you at our mutual convenience. We also welcome invitations to speak with your group. Find us on Facebook or Twitter.

 


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Daystar’s 7th Annual Samuel L. Stolt Memorial Golf Tournament

It’s time to tee up for Daystar! Please join us at Bristol Harbour Resort in Canandaigua on Monday, August 7, 2017 for the 7th Annual Samuel L. Stolt Memorial Golf Tournament.  Your participation will give children with special healthcare needs the best chances to learn, grow, and make lasting friendships with other children facing similar challenges.


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Samuel L. Stolt Memorial Golf Tournament

Daystar is teeing up for its 7th Annual Samuel L. Stolt Memorial Golf Tournament. Golfers will enjoy a fun filled day on the course at the beautiful Bristol Harbour Resort, topped off with a delectable dinner and chances to win from a variety of raffle and silent auction prizes. Participation will give children with special healthcare needs the best chances to learn, grow, and make lasting friendships with other children facing similar challenges.

 

 


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BBQ, Brews, & Blues with Steven Raichlen

Join WXXI at Frontier Field for an afternoon of BBQ, Brews, and Blues with Steven Raichlen, host of Primal Grill, Barbecue University, and Project Smoke. 

Enjoy an afternoon with Steven Raichlen, along with Raichlen-inspired BBQ tastings, local beers, a cooking demo, music, and more at Frontier Field (One Morrie Silver Way, Rochester). Steven may be best known as the man who reinvented barbecue. His top-rated public television programs have helped people all over the world ascend the ladder of grilling enlightenment. He’s also a journalist and author of more than 25 cookbooks, including the best-selling Barbecue Bible.

Tickets are $50 and include the BBQ tasting, one drink ticket, and an autographed copy of Steven’s most recent book Steven Raichlen: Barbeque Sauces, Rubs and Marinades. Or for $125, you’ll enjoy all that the $50 ticket offers, plus a pre-event meet and greet with Steven. Tickets are on sale now, and can be purchased by clicking here or by calling (585) 258-0200.


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RocGrowth Coffee

What is RocGrowth Coffee?

An informal morning event designed to facilitate USEFUL collisions by sharing inspiring stories and empowering the new generation of entrepreneurs in Rochester.   Free coffee and bagels will be provided by our underwriters.  It’s affiliated with RocGrowth Candids.

 Why attend?

To meet and befriend other Rochester innovators and become familiar with potentially helpful resources.  RocGrowth Coffee is a way for you to hear about new ideas, offer YOUR assistance, and announce YOUR ideas to a community of thinkers, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists!

 

Format

Each RocGrowth Coffee will highlight several pre-selected local innovators. These entrepreneurs will have a few minutes to introduce themselves and describe their endeavor.  More importantly, they will ask the community for some specific form of support that could range from technical skills to customer identification.

The audience (YOU) will be able to connect with each other and the entrepreneurs before and after the presentations, over coffee and breakfast.  Most of the time will be unstructured networking.

 NOTE: If you would like to be among the innovators who present to the group for THREE minutes, e-mail info@rocgrowth.com.  Briefly introduce yourself, explain a project or business you’ve started, and make a request for specific assistance.  We have limited the number of presenters to four.

 


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#RocCity Doer: Jonathan Nwagbaraocha

Joseph Barcia, RocCity Coalition

RocCity Coalition is a collection of people from various facets of the community whom are connecting with one another to achieve a stronger Rochester. Jonathan Nwagbaraocha is a transplant who works at Xerox and is president of YP NeXus, the company’s young professional group, which is one of RocCity Coalition’s member organizations.

YP NeXus is one of Xerox’s caucus groups; others include the National Black Employee Association, Hispanic Association for Professional Advancement, Asians Coming Together, The Women’s Alliance, Black Women’s Leadership Council, GALAXe Pride at Work and Veteran Service Members Association.

With YP NeXus, Xerox does more than promote volunteerism among its young professionals. Jonathan explained that YP NeXus is not only a way to get involved with projects that benefit the community but gives members a direct link to senior management, the creative space to plan events, and a launchpad for outside volunteer interests.

What got you involved in YP NeXus?
I was new at Xerox and someone advised me to get involved with YP Nexus. She said, “You’re new. This is your way to get involved.”  Then I ran for president. Before coming to Xerox I’ve worked in organizations where the management structure prevented you from offering new ideas. Those haven’t been pleasant places to work. That’s one of the reasons why when I found out about YP NeXus I was like, “This is different.”


What sort of group is NeXus within Xerox’s culture?
We want to make sure Xerox retains young professionals, so we have YP NeXus. We’re only one caucus group. Corporate culture is encouraging of diversity. There’s the black women’s association, GALAXe, a hispanic caucus, and more. When you’re a member of a community it’s not just about you or your family but the larger family as well.  One thing that shines through whenever the caucus presidents meet is that we want to understand one another because we’re all part of the same community. We ask, “How can I be a better advocate for you?” I’ve been able to speak with senior executives I wouldn’t have been able to speak with otherwise. One thing that shines through is you sit at the table and no corporate champion is unapproachable.

What is your takeaway from your direct line of communication with senior management?
I think you have to assess what your values are as a company. Beyond making money, what are our corporate values? That’s where you start. Some companies haven’t done that and are willfully ignorant about what values they should have to be a company you want to work for – or they just sound good on paper.

I haven’t come across an organization that gives that level of support. Before Jeff Jacobson started as CEO he met with some of us. The caucus groups meet with high senior executives in the company. They want us to be engaged. Jeff Jacobson even offered me a ride between buildings on campus.

At Xerox, there’s a from-the-top commitment to being a good citizen. There is a foundation of diversity and inclusion that predates the caucus groups. Joseph C. Wilson set the ball rolling that the company thinks about the community. We did a round table recently with the CEO, who wants to hear from young professionals. We have regular diversity trainings. Our next topic is unconscious bias.

What is the role of volunteerism in YP NeXus?

Part of what I love about my role as president is encouraging people to volunteer. We’re always trying to reach out to other young professional groups in the city. We want to encourage members to go to events in the community, whether or not we organize them. Maybe you don’t want to be president but if there’s something you want to do and invite other people, do it. As a partner with RocCity Coalition, I let members know about those events.

Each November we have YP NeXus Random Act of Kindness Week. This year we will make Disney countdown calendars for Make-a-Wish Foundation children, put together paracord ropes for deployed soldiers through Operation Gratitude, and make fleece blankets to warm hospitalized children of Project Linus.

Is Rochester’s NeXus group an example for other chapters?
The Rochester chapter is the flagship NeXus chapter. For years we have participated in United Way’s Day of Caring. We have the support of HR and management to be released from work to volunteer. Everyone gets excited. This year the Rochester chapter volunteered with the Genesee Land Trust to spring clean the El Camino Trail in downtown Rochester.

In Rochester this has been going on for years but we did it nationally for the first time this year. What was going on when we reached out to the Norwalk, CT and Wilsonville, OR chapters was that they weren’t going out in the community. Now we’re making that national. They’re talking to the United Way in their areas and making it happen.

What else excites you about YP NeXus?

We’re all kind of mentoring each other. We mentor to encourage translating eagerness to help into action. Part of the key in taking energy into action is to look at “what do we want to achieve” and then say “this is how we’re going to do it.” If there’s a good idea, we talk about it and then agree to do it. As YP NeXus grows we want to make sure we are setting good groundwork for future actions [by other chapters]. The Rochester chapter is the largest chapter. Other cities have young professionals doing great things but haven’t been made official chapters yet.

What led you to Rochester?
I graduated from law school and spent time in Baltimore representing families with lead-poisoned kids. That took me to DC, consulting multinationals on environmental compliance. That job took me to Belgium, and then I got the opportunity at Xerox. My wife and I were looking for new opportunities on the east or west coasts. I didn’t know when I applied the Xerox job was in Rochester.I was pleasantly surprised by Rochester. I didn’t have low expectations but I only knew RIT, and it’s a little different. The city has a lot of charm. My wife and I love city living. We lived in the East Ave area and recently moved to the South Wedge.

Outside of work, what keeps you in Rochester?
My wife and I have found it’s very easy to get involved in things. It’s an affordable city. Every time my in-laws visit they are amazed. You’d think a city this size wouldn’t have much, but they’re always finding something new to do when they come here. It’s very easy to get involved in different organizations here. The resources are there and it’s an easy city not just to live in but to get involved in.

What’s your best advice for other young professionals, wherever they may work?
Don’t feel afraid to get involved. You don’t have to have a leadership role if you don’t want to. Just get involved and plan something. For me it started with YP NeXus. I was new to the area and wanted to meet other young professionals. Then I looked at other opportunities and also became involved with Pillars of Hope. Getting involved is the key.


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Cohousing’s Community 1st Service Project

Open to the Public

Highland Park Gardening Project is Under Way — Join us!

Flower City Cohousing Community’s first community service project, maintaining the lovely flower gardens in Highland Park at the southwest corner of Goodman and Highland, is under way. We work from 9-11am the second Saturday and last Tuesday of each month.

Our next date is July 25th. Come and leave any time during that period to help with weeding, deadheading, etc. Friends and newcomers welcome. Bring weeding and deadheading tools (hoe, trowel, clippers, gloves, kneeler, etc.) sunscreen and water.

If you have questions or to RSVP (we appreciate advance notice) contact Jane at 585-315-2406 or jellen@rochester.rr.com. Parking is on Goodman just south of Highland, next to the garden.

 


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RocGrowth Candids

 

 RocGrowth Candids is a bi-monthly event featuring local entrepreneurs who share their personal stories and lessons learned building successful businesses.

We are pleased to feature Ken Wasnock, serial entrepreneur and CEO of Garden Trends.  In his 20s, he started Concentrix, a marketing and fulfillment company that employs hundreds in the Rochester area.  He subsequently started five more high growth, venture backed companies in the marketing and publishing fields.  At Garden Trends, he is modernizing a 100+ year old company that owns Harris Seeds and other niche agricultural operations.   We will hear firsthand from an irrepressible entrepreneur and how he approaches innovation and building culture.

We start and finish with informal kibitzing over drinks and hors d’oeuvres.  In between, we conduct an open interview, followed by Q&A, with our featured guests.  It’s free, but attendance is limited to the first 100 RSVPs.  So, register soon since the events “sell out.”

The event is free, thanks to our sponsor, Complemar.  We request a $5 donation to our host, the non-profit Downstairs Cabaret Theatre.

Click Here to Register

When:                                Wednesday, July 12, 2017

                                              5:30 – 7:30pm

                                              (Formal schedule begins at 6:00pm)

 

Location:                           Downstairs Cabaret Theatre

                                              20 Windsor Street, Rochester, NY 14605

 

Refreshments:                Light hors d’oeuvres from Hart’s Grocers.  Cash bar.

 

RSVP:                                  Required. Capacity limited to 100

                                              Click here to register at Eventbrite

                                              Request a $5 donation to Downstairs Cabaret at the door.

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT:  Are you an entrepreneur or consultant working alone? Are you curious about coworking and how it can help you?  Check out Community Coworking @ the Rochester Brainery every Friday (9AM – 4PM). Everyone is welcome to come and try it for the day! Read more at www.roccommunitycoworking.com


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#RocCity Doer: Vanessa Cheeks

Joseph Barcia, RocCity Coalition

RocCity Coalition is a collection of people from various facets of the community whom are connecting with one another to achieve a stronger Rochester. Vanessa Cheeks is a local writer whose byline appears these days throughout Open Mic, an online-based black publication.

Vanessa is a Rochester area native whose passion for the city and its potential aligns with RocCity Coalition’s Vision 2025 plan. She is finishing a bachelor’s degree in advertising and communications with a minor in journalism. At the core of Vanessa’s work as a journalist is a desire to help people and make an impact.

Vanessa chatted with us about inclusive revitalization, the value of critical perspectives, and the importance of fair storytelling.

Where are you from originally?
I’m from Rochester and grew up across the street in Seabreeze, but as a kid we traveled a lot to see family in the south. Ultimately I moved to North Carolina as a kid and came back in grade school. As an adult I got an opportunity to live in the middle east which was great and then landed in Virginia, but Rochester has always been home. I think that is something native Rochesterians share. You can’t help but come back and feel like you never left.

What got you started writing?
I have always had a knack for writing, but in school it was book reports and essays. I love it, so journalism was an easy step. It was hard getting started, though. I made a lot of mistakes. My first opportunity came from MCC. I wrote for the Tribute out of the Brighton campus. I made a lot of mistakes. I don’t think I had even taken a journalism class yet! But I believe in hands-on learning, so it was a great experience and helped me get into Rochester Woman Magazine and then Open Mic after that.

What do you like best about working for Open Mic?
Being able to say what I wanted to say and not be worried about being censored in a way. When I was writing for Rochester Woman Magazine there were things I wanted to write about from the perspective of a black woman living in Rochester that didn’t make it to print all the time. I wanted to write for a publication that would allow me to ask questions where they don’t get swept under the rug or pushed aside or even misunderstood. These things often affect communities of color so I put it out in the universe and within a month I connected with Tianna, editor at OM. It has been a dream since then.  

As an area native, what are your thoughts on the revitalization under way?
Revitalization is always good, especially when you can balance the historic value of the old and the energy of the new. That being said, I don’t want to see Rochester take off and leave part of its community behind. I went to TedX Rochester and a speaker presented an idea about demolishing an entire neighborhood in Rochester to make way for a more upscale housing. After the talk, an organizer told me the speaker believed that the current residents were renters, low income and not able to bring value to the area, so just remove them. Even holding those ideas, he was still allowed to give the talk. Those types of ideas, which have the potential to displace people of color and people in challenged communities, are dangerous. I think if you are talking about changing, moving, demolishing, rebuilding, you need to ask yourself how it affects people that currently occupy those spaces and how everyone can benefit from it.

Historically the narrative we have about prominent figures and major events has always been a little skewed.
Being able to find fault in something or someone is not attacking, just knowing. The conversation can be had. I have never found someone whose life was ruined by having a better understanding of something. When celebrating Susan B. Anthony we don’t talk about how she was racist and how when women got the right to vote it wasn’t all women. We had to wait even longer to go to a voting booth and cast a ballot without any interference. It’s not bad to talk about these things and it’s necessary. If I had kids I would want them to know Christopher Columbus was garbage and Rosa Parks wasn’t just tired. She was working as part of a movement. These narratives are changed and altered. There was the movie about the Stonewall riots and they just added this character and people say, “It’s fine! It’s just a movie.” It’s not fine. It changes the story in a way that discredits the people of color who were actually influential in making these changes. You have to be able to let people tell their own story. That’s how you get and keep the truth even if it is a complicated truth.

You recently did a story about millennials in Rochester. What led to this idea?
New data released suggested Rochester’s millennial population is the fastest growing. We are also a large part of the workforce and that number is going up as well. But, despite the negativity that surrounds us, we really are interested in making our communities better. We want walkable green spaces, we want to support local businesses, we are demanding work/life balance, and, while a lot of articles put a negative spin on these things, ultimately millennials are inheriting this town and we are kicking ass to make it something we want to live in.

Do you think allies receive more chances to speak than the people they’re speaking up for?
Allies sometimes feel they don’t want to step aside because they don’t want to lose recognition. That’s understandable. When I do something I want credit. But to be an ally – whether it has to do with race, sexuality, anything – you have to be prepared to silence yourself for someone else to take your place and not treat someone like they’re speaking for an entire community. I haven’t seen it yet, but I would love to see someone step aside. If you look around and see a panel, speaker list, artist lineup, whatever and there are very few or no people of color, give someone your spot. Don’t just comment on the lack of diversity. Take action.

What’s Open Mic’s approach?
At Open Mic we definitely try not to speak for people. For us our writing style has more to do with accessibility. When we write it can’t be so technical. We want facts. It has to be accurate. It’s also about creating accessibility. When people read it you want them to understand it and not come away feeling like they understand less of what they’re reading about. We reach a broader audience but our accessibility online skews our audience a little younger.

How do you approach storytelling through Open Mic?
As a journalist you have to follow rules of engagement and writing. Sometimes I ask questions and just let people talk. I would much rather have an hour or hour and a half of you telling your story than ask short questions and get short answers. It can be hard to put it into words. I know Tianna would rather I am on time with my deadlines, but sometimes you need to let the interview marinate and find perfect quotes to let someone speak for themselves.

It seems Open Mic appreciates intersectionality.
Intersectionality is the tool to use to find overlaps. People in communities are diverse. There are black gay people. There are people of color who are into comics. Life has overlap, and being able to tell the story of or for our community that highlights our variety is fantastic. Open Mic appreciates intersectionality because we embody it and we know that our readers do as well.

How has Open Mic helped you use your voice?
Open Mic helped me understand the things I’m passionate about a lot more. I wrote some personal pieces about my life, about how racism within my family made it hard for me to like myself and how I had an abortion when I was younger. I think without OM I would never have the nerve to say these things out loud, but knowing I have the support of my fellow writers and editor is like having an army behind you. Our stories are important as well. When we cover the mayor’s time in office, community gardens, or millennials in Rochester, it is important to all of us. Writing for a magazine has taught me not to get stuck in a bubble and to look at every aspect of something.

Is the wider community aware of Open Mic?
I think the community could benefit more from sending us press releases for everything. We want people to read our publication. If black people are the only people reading a black publication it kind of creates a vacuum. We have amateur bloggers getting invited to press events and we are not as regularly. We are a credible news organization. If you’re a business or hosting something, definitely think about who you’re reaching out to. Do a quick Google search and if there’s a black publication, include them in your event. Again, if you are looking around a press event and there are no media professionals of color, speak up!

What’s next for you?
I love writing for Open Mic. Writing for OM impacts people on a community level. I like helping people understand the world around them and I want the opportunity to make policies and help people on a wider level. I’ve decided to go into government. I have my eye on counter terrorism or working for a federal agency, still writing but to impact policy. OM has given me the guts to stand up for what I believe in and I want to take that all the way to the top.